Safeguard Investigation Launched by ITC in Response to Section 201 Petition for Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber Imports - Sobel Network Shipping Co., Inc.

Safeguard Investigation Launched by ITC in Response to Section 201 Petition for Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber Imports

The International Trade Commission (ITC) has launched a safeguard investigation in response to a petition filed under Section 201 of the 1974 Trade Act, which aims to determine whether increased imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber are causing substantial injury or threatening to do so to the U.S. industry.

The investigation specifically covers fine denier PSF, not carded or combed, measuring less than 3.3 decitex (3 denier) in diameter. This includes all types of fine denier PSF, regardless of whether they are coated or uncoated, and falls under the HTSUS 5503.20.0025 classification.

It’s important to note that certain products are exempt from this investigation, such as PSF equal to or greater than 3.3 decitex (more than 3 denier, inclusive) and low-melt PSF, which has one component that melts at a lower temperature than the other. These products are currently classified under HTSUS 5503.20.0045, 5503.20.0065, and 5503.20.0015, respectively.

The ITC will hold hearings on June 4 to gather information on injury, and if necessary, on July 23 to discuss potential remedies. Interested parties can submit pre-hearing briefs by May 28 and July 16, and post-hearing briefs by June 11 and July 29. The ITC is expected to make its injury determination by July 9 and submit a report to the president by August 26.

If the ITC finds that the U.S. industry is being substantially harmed by increased imports of fine denier PSF, it may recommend relief measures such as tariff increases, quotas, tariff-rate quotas, trade adjustment assistance, or a combination of these. However, it is ultimately up to the president to make the final decision on whether to provide relief and what form, amount, and duration it will take. The initial relief can last for up to four years and can be extended for a maximum of eight years.

It’s important to note that any relief proposed by the ITC is only advisory and the final decision rests with the president. The goal of any potential relief measures is to help the affected U.S. industry adjust to increased import competition.